Month: March 2017

Software Craftsmanship and Heroism

A certain restaurant in the Silicon Valley has a sign which says “This is a bad place for a diet. This is a good place for a diet.” There is no contradiction – just 2 different contexts.

So it is with Software Craftsmanship and heroism. The opposite of heroism in software development is a smooth operation high up the CMMI ladder, where everyone knows what to do and no one wastes time or stresses out because the process is moving forward. On the bottom of the CMMI ladder, on the other hand, it’s sometimes chaos, and a developer can be put under pressure to deliver in a hurry because of bad communication or poorly designed and/or poorly tested code encountering demanding clients.

Software craftsmanship is bad for heroism because it reduces the chaos that requires a heroic developer to step in and fix things in a hurry. There’s a software factory pipeline that doesn’t let logic failures reach the client.

Software craftsmanship is good for heroism because sometimes even with a solid agile process and a finely-tuned software factory pipeline and clean, unit-tested code, misconceptions can slip in and a client can do something that the unit tests did not foresee and (rightly) complain about it. And why is craftsmanship good for heroism in this case? Because the code with the error is clean, extensible and unit-testable. If you have an idea for a fix, you can try it out in minutes in a unit test instead of having to code blindly, build, run and test manually and then repeat the process until it’s debugged or you decide to take a different approach. Ultimately, the software craftsperson has to build and run and test manually, but only AFTER the key idea for a solution has been tested and debugged. So with craftsmanship, you may have some shining moments of glory, but the heroic struggle happens gradually, every day, maintaining the quality of the code and the software factory.