Tag: Fun

Finding Fun

It’s hard to master software development if you don’t enjoy doing it, so you’ve got to find fun. There’s a lot of fun to be found in software development (unless you’re one of those people who really can’t program).

We should be thankful that our job allows us to have fun. There are plenty of jobs where it’s a lot more difficult to find fun.

So how to find fun?

Learn

Discovery and mastery are fun. If what you discover and master are relevant to your work, your employer will probably accept that at least a small part of your time is spent on learning. It’s in your employer’s interest to have developers who are up to speed. At a minimum you should be able to organize a “brown bag” session to learn during lunch time.

Share learning

Brown bag lunches are also a fun opportunity to share what you’ve learned with others. So is pair programming.

Gamify

Challenging yourself makes things more fun. Challenging others adds even more fun.

Doing TDD lets you create little challenges all the time for yourself. You can also challenge yourself to move the needle on certain code metrics (test coverage, cyclomatic complexity, PMD/Findbugs issue count, etc.), within reason (choose metrics which actually add value to your work). Following the Boy Scout Rule, you can challenge yourself to make a big ugly method into small, beautiful methods.

One suggestion I heard recently to make pair programming more fun is to play “TDD pong”. One member of the pair writes a test and then challenges the other to make the test pass. Then the roles switch.

I also heard recently from a scrum master who invented a role-playing system (using Star Wars characters to bridge the gap between older and younger developers) where each developer is assigned for a sprint a certain character.  Each character gets points for doing a different thing, such as writing “perfect” unit tests, facilitating communication between developers, enhancing code performance, etc.  Whoever has the most points at the end of the sprint gets a small prize. The idea is to get less experienced developers  to adapt good practices by having them focus on one practice at a time.

Take micro-breaks

When it’s not fun, stop for a minute. Even when it is fun, stop for a minute now and then. Your eyes and wrists will thank you, and things will stay fun longer.

Laugh

We can laugh at what we do, our processes, our teams, our way of thinking.

We live in a silly world. A generation ago, if you walked down the street alone while having a conversation, people would think you have some form of schizophrenia. Now they just think you have some form of bluetooth device. It’s best not to take things too seriously.

Laughing at your test data:
Be careful, because some of your test data might turn up in a commercial presentation which could make or break your employer’s reputation, and you don’t want to waste too much time on non-essential tasks, but you can make your test data more fun.

For example, if you have a test database which needs a list of video game titles, you could enter “game1”, “game2”, “game3”, etc.  Or you could enter “Accountant’s Creed”, “Angry Nerds”, “Bassoon Hero”, “Mimecraft”, “Unreal Fantasy”, “Shower Defense”, “Handy Crutch Saga”, “Grand Theft Lotto”, “Call of Booty”, “Resident E-mail”, etc. Your choice.

Create

We’re fortunate enough to do work where we get to create things with our minds. Don’t be afraid to break out your metaphorical “box of crayons”.

 

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